Omnivore collects Chris Hillman's "Asylum Years"


Out Feb. 9, a compilation of the former Byrds' early solo material.

Details:

Chris Hillman co-founded some of the most classic, seminal, groundbreaking acts of the ’60s and ’70s including The Byrds, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas, and The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band. But, in the mid 1970s, Hillman decided it was time to try things on his own.

1976 brought Slippin’ Away, the musical journeyman’s first solo release. Produced by renowned engineers Ron and Howard Albert (Derek And The Dominoes, Allman Bros., Jimi Hendrix), it was a star-studded affair, featuring members of Booker T. & The M.G.’s, Poco, Buffalo Springfield, The Turtles, and ace studio musicians. Hillman took his place as front-man, and the results were the epitome of the classic ’70s LA sound.

He returned the following year with Clear Sailin’, which saw him dial back the flashy supporting cast for a more traditional release—much like the iconic music he had created in his early years with The Byrds and Burritos. For Clear Sailin’ Hillman assembled a core band (including soon-to-be-superstar Richard Marx) with production helmed by Jim Mascon (Poco, Firefall). A number of songs feature co-writes with Crawdaddy magazine’s founder, Peter Knobler.

Hot on the heels of his 2017 critically acclaimed album (produced by Tom Petty), The Asylum Years presents both of those ’70s albums on one compact disc, with an essay from Scott Schinder, featuring a new interview with Hillman.

Having been a catalyst and innovator on the musical landscape for decades, The Asylum Years sees this byrd take flight.

Tracks:
  1. Step On Out
  2. Slippin’ Away
  3. Falling Again
  4. Take It On The Run
  5. Blue Morning
  6. Witching Hour
  7. Down In The Churchyard
  8. Love Is The Sweetwest Amnesty
  9. Midnight Again
  10. (Take Me In Your) Lifeboat
  11. Nothing Gets Through
  12. Fallen Favorite
  13. Quits
  14. Hot Dusty Roads
  15. Heartbreaker
  16. Playing The Fool
  17. Lucky In Love
  18. Rollin’ And Tumblin’
  19. Ain’t That Peculiar
  20. Clear Sailin’

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"Both Sides of the Sky," new collection of lost Jimi Hendrix recordings out March 9


You can pre-order it now from Amazon.

Details:

This special album presents thirteen Jimi Hendrix studio recordings ­including ten which have never before been released. 

Both Sides of the Sky is the third volume in a trilogy of albums with Valleys Of Neptune and People, Hell and Angels, intended to present the best and most significant unissued studio recordings remaining in the Hendrix archive. 


Recorded between January 1968 and February 1970, Jimi’s desire to push the boundaries of blues music can be heard throughout. Both Sides of the Sky additionally highlights Jimi’s mastery of studio production and his increasing use of these facilities as a proving ground for new sounds, material, and techniques. Many of the album’s tracks were recorded by the trio that would come to be known as Band of Gypsys: Jimi on guitar and vocals, Billy Cox on bass, and Buddy Miles on drums. For their first-ever recording session on April 22, 1969, Hendrix turned to their shared musical root, delta blues. Their previously unreleased, uptempo reworking of Muddy Waters’ “Mannish Boy” opens the album and sets the tempo for what follows. “Lover Man” was a favored Hendrix original and the guitarist was determined to realize a finished master. Previous attempts by the original Experience had yet to yield this for Hendrix but this December 1969 effort by the Band Of Gypsys — complete with its homage to the popular Batman theme song—was his strongest effort to date. 


“Hear My Train A Comin'” features drummer Mitch Mitchell and bassist Noel Redding from the original Jimi Hendrix Experience. This original blues composition had become a staple of Hendrix’s concerts. This previously unreleased April 1969 recording captured the furious power and dynamic tension that made the song so memorable. Previously unheard recordings of “Stepping Stone,” “Jungle,” “Cherokee Mist” (which features Hendrix on both electric guitar and sitar) as well as the January 1968 recording of “Sweet Angel” provide further highlights. 


Both Sides of the Sky also features an assortment of notable guest musicians. Stephen Stills befriended Hendrix at the June 1967 Monterey Pop Festival. In September of 1969 Stills was invited to a Hendrix session at the Record Plant in New York. Stills burst into the session with a song Joni Mitchell had recently composed, titled “Woodstock.” Joined by Hendrix and Buddy Miles, the trio recorded this version first--months before Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young released their popular rendition of Mitchell’s song. Stills would also contribute “$20 Fine,” an original song that featured Hendrix on multiple guitars, Mitchell on drums, Stills on organ and lead vocals and Duane Hitchings (Buddy Miles Express) on piano. 


Another of the album’s unique band creations sees Jimi Hendrix and Johnny Winter on guitar, backed by Billy Cox and drummer Dallas Taylor of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. An excerpt of their rendition of Guitar Slim’s “Things I Used To Do” was initially heard as part of a 1990 nationally syndicated radio program and accompanying box set, but here it is presented in full, newly mixed by Eddie Kramer for Both Sides of The Sky. On “Georgia Blues,” Jimi is reunited with his old bandmate Lonnie Youngblood (vocals/sax) from his pre-fame days in Curtis Knight & The Squires. Briefly issued as part of the 2008 Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues series but out of print for nearly a decade, this special recording is once more available to Hendrix fans throughout the world on all audio formats.


Tracks:

1)    Mannish Boy*
2)    Lover Man*
3)    Hear My Train A Comin'*
4)    Stepping Stone*
5)    $20 Fine*+
6)    Power Of Soul^
7)    Jungle*
8)    Things I Used to Do#
9)    Georgia Blues++
10)  Sweet Angel*
11)  Woodstock*+
12)  Send My Love To Linda*
13)  Cherokee Mist*

*Previously unreleased
^ Previously unavailable extended version
+Featuring Stephen Stills
#Featuring Johnny Winter
++Featuring Lonnie Youngblood

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