Wednesday, October 09, 2019

New Comics Day: All Star Comics - Only Legends Live Forever; Amazing Fantasy #15 Facsimile Edition; Donald Duck; Strange Love Stories of Ogden Whitney; Frontline Combat; Ghosts Pre-Code Horror Comics

Our picks. Click the links to order from Amazon.

Witness the continuing adventures of the Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, Doctor Fate and Wildcat as they're joined by younger heroes Robin, Power Girl and Star-Spangled Kid to battle the Psycho-Pirate, the immortal Vandal Savage, the Injustice Society and more. The classic 1970s run of the Justice Society of America is now collected in a single volume from the pages of ALL-STAR COMICS #58-74, ADVENTURE COMICS #461-466 and DC SPECIAL #29.

The landmark, industry-changing issue that introduced the Amazing Spider-Man! When high school wallflower Peter Parker is bitten by a radioactive spider, his life is transformed - first for the better, then for the worse! With his new array of arachnid abilities - including speed, strength, agility and, thanks to his scientific know-how, spinning webs - Peter seeks fame as the costumed celebrity called Spider-Man! But his cavalier attitude soon comes back to haunt him, and shatter the lives of his beloved Uncle Ben and Aunt May! Peter Parker is about to learn a powerful lesson, one that has never been taught better than by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko: With great power there must also come great responsibility! It's one of the all-time great Marvel comic books, boldly re-presented in its original form, ads and all! Reprinting AMAZING FANTASY (1962) #15.

Ogden Whitney was one of the unsung masters of American comics. He is perhaps best remembered for co-creating the satirical superhero Herbie Popnecker, also known as the Fat Fury, but his romance comics of the late 1950s and 1960s may be even more unique. In Whitney’s hands, the standard formula of meet-cute, minor complications, and final blissful kiss becomes something very different: an unsettling vision of midcentury American romance as a devastating power struggle, a form of intimate psychological warfare dressed up in pearls and flannel suits. From suburban lawns and offices to rocket labs and factories, his men and women scheme and clash, dominate and escape. It is darkly hilarious, truly terrifying—and yes, occasionally even a bit romantic.

When Donald decides to let his nephews pick their own Christmas present they choose ― a Ferris Wheel! Only Uncle Scrooge can pay for a Ferris Wheel, but that he’ll only do it if Donald goes to Canada to pick up a 100-foot Christmas tree for the town square. Carl Barks delivers another superb collection of imaginative exuberance, rollicking high adventure, and all-around cartooning brilliance. Over 170 pages of story and art, each meticulously restored and newly colored. 

In these classic EC tales, we are taken to War in the true grueling and horrific light that few comics of the time dared to show!
Collecting Frontline Combat #7-12, this volume features--in fully remastered digital color--the work of comic book greats Harvey Kurtzman, Wally Wood, John Severin, Bill Elder, George Evans, and Alex Toth!
Collects Frontline Combat issues #7-#12.

From the terror team that curdled your blood with Haunted Horror, Zombies, Return of the Zombies, Haunted Love, and MummiesGHOSTS is the latest and ghastly greatest in the Chilling Archives of Horror Comics collections. Over 240 pages of appalling apparitions, formidable phantoms, shuddery seances, shivery spooks 'n specters, and evil wraiths with much more than just revenge on their murdered minds! 
Featuring hair-raising precode '50s horror gems from Alex Toth, John Blummer, Sid Check, Lin Streeter, Ross Andru, Lou Cameron, King Ward, and many more. And be sure to cover your own head while gazing over a ghostly gallery of classic cover creeps!

Beginning with the very first Star Wars comics, published alongside the release of the original film in 1977, this comprehensive exploration includes this early era through to Marvel’s return to the Star Warsbrand in 2015 and beyond. 

Focusing on ten major themes—disaster, superheroes, sex, the suburbs, cities, punk, illness and disability, girls, war, and queerness—Chute explains how comics get their messages across more effectively than any other form. “Why Disaster?” explores how comics are uniquely suited to convey the scale and disorientation of calamity, from Art Spiegelman’s representation of the Holocaust and 9/11 to Keiji Nakazawa’s focus on Hiroshima. “Why the Suburbs?” examines how the work of Chris Ware and Charles Burns illustrates the quiet joys and struggles of suburban existence; and “Why Punk?” delves into how comics inspire and reflect the punk movement’s DIY aesthetics—giving birth to a democratic medium increasingly embraced by some of today’s most significant artists.

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